The Dane County Office of
Energy and Climate Change
The Dane County Office of Energy and Climate Change
Dane County Seal

Climate Change is Here.

2014 was the hottest year on record until 2015, until 2016. According to NASA climate scientists, the Earth has not been this warm in 115,000 years and has not experienced such high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere for 4 million years.

Climate change is happening and it’s not just the polar ice caps melting. It’s happening in Dane County. Lakes Mendota and Monona are not staying frozen as long as they used to. 150 years of recordkeeping of when the lakes freeze over and when the ice breaks up shows a long-term downward trend.  150 years ago the ice lasted 4 months on Lake Mendota. Today it lasts only 3 months.

While the President and Congress balk at new requirements to reduce climate change emissions, and state experts are prohibited to work on climate change because on an Executive Order from the Governor, local governments are once again in the best position to demonstrate leadership and vision.

 
Photo of Joe Parisi

"We cannot wait for the state and federal government to step up, we must lead the effort to address climate change."

Dane County Executive Joe Parisi
 

Initiatives

Learn more about current and future programs that reduce Dane County's carbon footprint.

Who we are

Learn about the The Office of Energy and Climate Change.

Get Involved

Contact us to discover how you can help us to reduce Dane County's carbon footprint.